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New Testament

Dr. Albin Huss, Chair

The aim of the New Testament Department is to equip students to accurately exegete the New Testament in order to effectively communicate the Word of God and to apply it in their own lives and ministries. The program is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the historical background, language, principles of interpretation, interpretive challenges, and theology of the New Testament writings. Students will become adept with the use of the essential interpretive tools of Greek grammar and syntax as well as lexical and literary analysis. The courses are designed to provide the breadth and depth needed for the student to move from exegesis of the NT to biblical theology and finally to exposition with an emphasis upon contemporary relevance. The department seeks to integrate the numerous sub-disciplines in a context that enhances the student's passion for both God and His Word.
NT401 ELEMENTARY GREEK (two credits)

This introductory course is offered for the student who has not previously completed a basic study of elementary Greek. The scope of the material includes the vocabulary, grammar, and syntax of the Koine Greek of the New Testament with special emphasis given to form and function. Distinctive to this course is the incorporation of up-to-date linguistic methodology as well as an emphasis on contemporary models of language learning. Students will be given exercises relating to the New Testament and will be required to systematically master numerous aspects of the Greek language.

NT402 ELEMENTARY GREEK (two credits)

A continuation of NT401. Distinctive to this semester are the introduction to block diagramming and its application to selected texts from the gospels. By the end of the semester, students are expected to have mastered basic aspects of this discipline, be able to use the standard Greek lexicon (BDAG), and demonstrate basic mastery in translating large blocks of Greek text (primarily narrative passages).

NT501 GREEK SYNTAX (two credits)

A study of the structure of the Greek language of the New Testament including the functional relationship between parts of speech in the formation of clauses and sentences. Through extensive examples from the Greek NT, the student will become familiar with the major syntactical relationships and their significance for exegesis. This course will prepare the student for exegetical book studies. Prerequisite: NT402 or its equivalent.

NT502 GREEK EXEGESIS (two credits)

A study and application of exegetical principles to selected passages of the New Testament with an emphasis on proper interpretation and application to theological understanding and sermon preparation. Prerequisites: TH500, NT501 and PT521.

NT503 GREEK STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (two credits)

Building upon NT 502 Greek Syntax, Greek Structural Analysis comprises a study of the structure of the Greek language of the New Testament with particular emphasis upon the clause, sentence, and pericope levels. Through extensive examples from the Greek New Testament, the student will become familiar with the basic structural building blocks of the New Testament and the corresponding semantic relationships between them. This course will prepare the student for exegetical book studies.

NT510 NEW TESTAMENT BACKGROUNDS (two credits)

This course orients the student to background sources and information (i.e. historical, geographical, social, and cultural) that will assist the student both in better understanding the world of the NT and in the teaching of the NT.

NT520 NEW TESTAMENT INTRODUCTION (two credits)

An investigation of the critical problems relating to the canon, the text, and the transmission of the New Testament. The student receives an introduction to the history and procedures of textual criticism as well as an overview of the so-called Synoptic problem with emphasis upon the conservative solution. Particular problems relevant to current studies of New Testament interpretation are also presented and evaluated including recent literary-critical methodologies.

NT527 REVELATION (two credits)

This course offers an exposition of the concluding book of the NT following a futuristic, premillennial, and pretribulational interpretation. Other prominent schools of thought will also be treated with attention given to the book's structure, interpretive keys, and issues relevant to Bible prophecy. Background issues of authorship, date, and historical setting will also be considered as well as the crucial interpretive aspects of genre, interpreting symbols, and John's use of the Old Testament. Prerequisite: OT526.

NT600 NEW TESTAMENT PARABLES (two credits)

A survey of the hermeneutics of parabolic literature with an emphasis upon the parables found in Matthew. Each student also will be assigned independent research on a parable in Luke.

NT601 MATTHEW (two credits)

This course is concerned with the interpretation and communication of the Gospel of Matthew. The primary focus is upon interpretation. Concerning interpretation, the class discusses both introductory issues (genre, structure, theology) and expositional issues. The exposition is sensitive to both vertical analysis (Matthew's development) as well as horizontal analysis (comparisons between the gospels). Background material is also emphasized. Concerning communication, the class discusses the ramifications of Christ-centered, genre-sensitive, and audience-sensitive preaching.

NT603 LUKE (two credits)

This course emphasizes the interpretation and communication of the Gospel of Luke. The primary focus is upon interpretation. Concerning interpretation, the class will discuss both introductory issues (genre, structure, theology) and expositional issues. Concerning communication, the class will discuss the ramifications of Christ-centered, genre-sensitive, and audience-sensitive preaching.

NT604 JOHN (two credits)

An expository treatment of John's gospel in English, including consideration of the genre, language, overall structure, and theology. The unique features of this gospel relative to the Synoptics will be highlighted including the characteristic Johannine language, themes, and motifs. Discussions will include the importance of both the first century and OT backgrounds for understanding the message of this gospel. The Christological content along with the practical values of the book are stressed.

NT605 ACTS (two credits)

In this study of the NT book of Acts in English, the course emphasizes both introductory issues (i.e. historicity, genre, structure, and inter-canonical connections) and expository issues (interpretation, application, communication).

NT606 ROMANS (two credits)

This course provides a detailed examination and exposition of this Paul's theological magnum opus to the Romans. It seeks to exposit the text in analyzing some of the great doctrinal truths contained therein (e.g., condemnation, justification, and sanctification) and also examines debated interpretations. Although the focus is upon interpretation, time is also allotted to the application and communication.

NT607 CORINTHIAN EPISTLES (two credits)

This course emphasizes the interpretation and contextualization of the Corinthian epistles. Concerning interpretation, the class discusses both introductory issues (genre, structure, background, theology) and expositional issues. Concerning contextualization, the class discusses appropriate application and communication of the biblical text.

NT615 PASTORAL EPISTLES (two credits)

An English Bible study of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus with due consideration given to the Greek text. The background, thought development, and chronological placement of each book is studied. Emphasis is placed on instruction regarding pastoral leadership, organization, and administration of the local church. Contemporary issues such as sound teaching, pastoral care of members, role of women in the church, the pastor's call to ministry and personal life, wealth and Christians, and proper conduct of believers in the local church will be treated to provide a biblical basis for a philosophy of pastoral ministry.

NT619 HEBREWS (two credits)

An analytical and expository treatment of this epistle which contains many references to the Old Testament. Notice is given to the priesthood of Melchizedek in the Old Testament and its fulfillment in Christ and the manner in which Christ fulfills the types of the sacrificial system during the Old Testament economy.

NT645 PAUL AND THE LAW (two credits)

This course will consider Paul's teaching about the Mosaic law, one of the most controversial exegetical-theological issues of the past several decades, as well as an issue of fundamental importance in the history of theology and in New Testament interpretation. The historical developments will be traced including a detailed discussion of and response to the recent "new perspective." This course will focus on interpreting critical texts in Romans and Galatians and relating these texts within the broader framework of historical, biblical, and systematic theology. Prerequisites: TH504 and TH510.

NT655 NEW TESTAMENT BIBLICAL THEOLOGY (two credits)

This course will cover many of the major NT themes including the following: the Messianic mission and work of Christ; the mystery of the kingdom; the relationship between kingdom and church teaching; the law and Christian living; Christology in the Synoptics and Paul; and eschatology. The contributions of individual NT scholars will be highlighted. The course will also consider the issue of unity and diversity within the NT canon in the context of divine inspiration. Prerequisites: TH500 and TH510.

NT660 HISTORICAL GEOGRAPHY (two credits)

See also OT660. This course provides a study of the historical and geographical setting for the events of the Bible. Consideration will be given to the strategic location of the Holy Land, its climate and topography, archaeological evidences and the location of important biblical events and place names.

NT670-NT673 HOLY LAND STUDIES SEMINAR (one to four credits). See OT670-OT673.
NT702 GREEK EXEGESIS-MARK (two credits)

A course based on select passages of the original language of Mark dealing with the words and works of Christ. Special attention is given to the structure, theology, and the purpose of Mark. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT708 GREEK EXEGESIS-1 CORINTHIANS (two credits)

An exegetical study of select passages from the Greek text of 1 Corinthians that will reveal the historical background of the epistle and explain the doctrinal and practical implications of Paul's instruction to them. Special attention is given to the recurring violations of community within the church that were manifest in various ways. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT709 GREEK EXEGESIS-GALATIANS (two credits)

This course is an exegetical study of the book of Galatians in the original language in which there is a concentration upon the message, thought development, background, and theology of the book. There is a special emphasis on tracing the argument from the Greek text. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT710 GREEK EXEGESIS-EPHESIANS (two credits)

An exegetical study based on the original language of Ephesians highlighting the overarching purposes of God, the place of Christ's person and work within those purposes, the mystery of the church, and the doctrine and duty of the church. The study will address the letter's distinctive teaching on the Holy Spirit as well as issues about unity and diversity within the body of Christ together with the place and significance of spiritual gifts. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT711 GREEK EXEGESIS-PHILIPPIANS (two credits)

This course is a study of Paul's epistle to the Philippians in the original language. It emphasizes the message, thought development, background, and theology of the book. There is a special emphasis on tracing the argument from the Greek text. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT712 GREEK EXEGESIS-COLOSSIANS & PHILEMON (two credits)

A detailed exegetical study of Paul's epistles to the Colossians and to Philemon in the original language. The course explores the message, thought development, background, and theology of each book with particular attention given to the doctrinal errors which confronted the Christians. With Colossians the Christological content is emphasized. The study of Philemon stresses the principles relevant to social change. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT713 GREEK EXEGESIS-THESSALONIAN EPISTLES (two credits)

A detailed exegesis of Paul's epistles to the Thessalonians in the original language which explores their message, thought development, background, and theology. The course will emphasize the characteristics of a model church and a model minister, the necessity of moral purity and Christian love, the eschatological truths and their applications, and the conduct of Christians toward those believers who are out of spiritual step with doctrine. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT720 GREEK EXEGESIS-JAMES (two credits)

An exegesis of this epistle from the original language designed to highlight James' teaching on the purpose and value of testing in the Christian life, the relation of works and faith, and numerous practical matters such as the use and abuse of the tongue, wisdom, worldliness, poverty, and wealth. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT721 GREEK EXEGESIS-1 PETER (two credits)

An exegetical study of the epistle in its original language, structured to emphasize the doctrinal and practical implications of the epistle. Special consideration is given to the interpretation of problem passages. The student will gain an appreciation for the distinctive contribution made by 1 Peter to the NT's teaching regarding:suffering as a believer, the eschatological inheritance, righteous and holy living, Jesus Christ and salvation, and submission in service. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT722 Greek Exegesis/II Peter/Jude (two credits)

This course is a study of 2 Peter and Jude in the original language, in which there is a discussion of the message, thought development, background, synoptic relationship, and theology of each book. There is a special emphasis on translating, blocking, and tracing the argument from the Greek text.

NT723 GREEK EXEGESIS-Johannine Epistles(two credits)

This course comprises a detailed exegetical analysis of the Johannine Epistles in the original language which explores their message, thought development, background, and theology. This analytical study of 1, 2, and 3 John will highlight their distinguished theological treatise on the person and work of Christ and their immensely practical challenges regarding Christian ethics and love. Attention will be given to text critical challenges, issues of genre, and the literary structure of each letter. The importance of the first century setting (including the nature of John's opponents) will be discussed as well as the relationship of the Johannine epistles to the fourth gospel. Prerequisite: NT501.

NT730TM GREEK EXEGESIS IN GREEK TEXTS (three credits)

This course is designed to extend the student's exegetical skills through the analysis of selected texts from the NT epistles. In addition to the basic roles of lexical analysis, syntax, and Greek grammar in determining the meaning of a text, attention will be given to text critical challenges, the use of the Old Testament in the New, discourse analysis, issues of genre, and the literary structure of the NT epistles. The importance of the first century setting or background will also be highlighted. The course will include a critical assessment of several recent trends in the study of NT epistles including that of rhetorical criticism.

NT750TM ADVANCED GREEK GRAMMAR (three credits)

Building upon a basic understanding of Greek grammar and syntax, the student will be introduced to more advanced features of the language of the New Testament. In providing the student with tools to deal with some of the more challenging NT passages, the course will highlight the essential importance of grammar to accurate exegetical and theological studies.

NT751TM SEPTUAGINT STUDIES (three credits)

A study of the Septuagint for OT and NT study. Consideration is given to general introduction and history of the LXX, issues of the quality and accuracy of the text, and guidelines for its use in interpretation and preaching from the OT. Comparisons between the LXX and Hebrew OT will be made.

NT756TM JOHANNINE THEOLOGY (three credits)

The student will be introduced to the principal theological teachings and emphasis of the Gospel of John and the Johannine Epistles. Consideration will be given to historical trends in Johannine studies including recent developments. The key contributions of the Johannine writings to the broader corpus of NT and biblical theology will be detailed. Specific areas to be covered include: John and the OT, Christological titles in John, the role of the Holy Spirit, and the themes of light, darkness, new life, faith, and truth.

NT758TM PAULINE THEOLOGY (three credits)

The student will be introduced to the principal theological teachings and emphasis of the NT writings of the apostle Paul. Consideration will be given to major schools of thought and prominent individuals in the history of Pauline interpretation. The key contributions of Paul's writings to the broader corpus of NT and biblical theology will be detailed. Specific topics to be discussed include Paul's central doctrines of sin, redemption, righteousness, and justification by faith. Attention will be given to the so-called new perspective on Paul.

NT760TM HISTORY OF NEW TESTAMENT INTERPRETATION (three credits)

A survey of the history of the interpretation of the New Testament with a focus on the late eighteenth century to the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on prominent individuals and movements, the development of critical methodologies, the relationships between critical approaches and worldview, and evangelical responses to the key movements.

NT775TM THE USE OF THE OLD TESTAMENT IN THE NEW (three credits)

A study of the Old Testament usage by the NT writers with attention to the range of OT references (quotations, allusions, and echoes) and the complexities of usage. Fundamental hermeneutical issues will be discussed as they affect our understanding of how Jesus and the apostles read and applied the OT Scriptures. The student will become familiar will the basic categories of prophecy and fulfillment as well as typology, analogy, illustration, and legal proof. Selected passages from the gospels and the epistles will be considered in highlighting issues of contextual warrant and referent as well as questions of continuity and discontinuity between the testaments.

NT780TM CURRENT ISSUES IN NEW TESTAMENT STUDIES (three credits)

Issues of importance in New Testament history, criticism, interpretation, and theology are discussed in a seminar setting. Possible topics include the so-called "Quest for the Historical Jesus," the NT and literary criticism, aspects of the use of the OT in the New, NT distinctions between miracles and signs, the significance of "kingdom language" in the Gospels, and recent trends in Pauline studies.

NT800 NEW TESTAMENT SEMINAR (one credit)

Guided individual research to enable the student to develop skills in problem solving, research, and logical presentation of material.

NT810 NEW TESTAMENT SEMINAR (two credits). See NT800 for description.
NT820 INTERDEPARTMENTAL SEMINAR (two credits)

Guided individual research to enable the student to develop skills in problem solving, procedures of research, and logical presentation of material.